Tam Paton & The Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry. #NazarethHouse #Lasswade.

tp3

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/965545/holyrood-tam-paton-child-abuse-inquiry-bay-city-rollers-manager


 

MORE ON TAM PATON

  1. 80 Articles & Blogs on Tam Paton, The Rollers, Walton Hop, King, Denning etc..
  2. ‘Magic circle’ judge asked to resign for allowing homosexual activities to be conducted in public way
  3. McRae, Gallogley, Paton, Ibrox, Celtic’s Jock Stein & Kevin Kelly, The Catholic Church & Savile all over the damn place!
  4. TAM PATON & The Edinburgh “Scene”
  5. Circles & Rings: Major, Minor & Magic
  6. Bay City Rollers, Paton, Denning, Drugs, Paedophilia, Music & the missing £1.5 MILLION

 

On Twitter, check out the hashtag  #TamPaedoPaton

 

Nazareth House Aberdeen – “Battered” until he was “Black and blue all over my body”

APRIL 27th 2018

Nuns at Nazareth House were angry when police arrived to investigate
A man stripped and beat a boy “black and blue” in an assault at a children’s home, an inquiry has been told.

A witness at the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry, which is investigating the abuse of children in care, said that the man “battered hell” out of him at Nazareth House in Aberdeen in the 1960s when he was 11.

He said “I thought my time was up” and added that the nuns who ran the home would have been aware of the beating but did not come to see how he was.

The hearing in Edinburgh is now into the third day of examining four children’s homes, all of which have since closed, which were run by the Catholic congregation the Sisters of Nazareth.   https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/nuns-ignored-beating-of-boy-x7m3sfzrw

A man stripped and beat a boy “black and blue” in an assault at a children’s home, an inquiry has heard.

A witness at the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry said the man “battered hell” out of him at Nazareth House in Aberdeen in the 1960s when he was 11 years old.

He told the inquiry: “I thought my time was up.”

According to the witness the nuns who ran the home would have been aware of the incident but did not come to see how he was

Cops receive more than 300 complaints of alleged abuse by nuns at children’s homes 

The witness said the nuns who ran the home would have been aware of the incident but did not come to see how he was.

The hearing in Edinburgh is now into the third day of examining four children’s homes, no longer operating, which were run by the Catholic congregation the Sisters of Nazareth in Scotland.

The witness, now in his 60s, who cannot be identified, said he was attacked by the man – a regular visitor to the Aberdeen institution – after he was caught fighting or arguing with another boy.

He said: “He grabbed hold of me. He dragged me into a bathroom and battered hell out of me.”

The man had taken off the boy’s clothes, leaving him naked as he was punched, the inquiry was told.

“I was black and blue all over my body” said the witness, who could not recall how long the episode lasted.

He told senior counsel to the inquiry Colin MacAulay QC he has no idea why he was stripped, adding: “It’s not exactly a normal thing to do, is it, to a young boy? It’s a bit peculiar.”

He agreed he was shouting and screaming during the assault, which left him with bruises “all over my face, my back, my front and my legs”.

Pressed on whether the nuns would have been aware of the incident, he replied: “Yes definitely, they were aware but not one nun approached me.”

He told how he was unable to sleep that night and assumed he would not be going to school the next morning.

Former Shetland councillor found guilty of sexually abusing two girls

However, he said one nun told him: “Don’t think you’re getting away with not going to school.”

The witness told how the bus driver then referred him to the school headmaster and the police were called.

Officers later took him back to the home at Nazareth House, he told the inquiry, at which point a nun “took me into a wee side room and pulled me up for getting the police involved”. He added: “I told her it was the headmaster who called the police, not me.”

The witness said police had a word with the man but he did not believe the man was prosecuted.

“The annoying thing is he was back in the home that night, the next night after he assaulted me,” the witness added. “He was there every night for the next four years that I was there.”

The witness earlier told how the man would regularly turn up at the home at night, but he did not know what the purpose of the visits was.

“All the kids were terrified of him,” he said.

The witness also told how the nuns at the home were “quite abusive” and left him with a phobia of nuns ever since.
The inquiry, before Lady Smith, continues. https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/man-stripped-beat-boy-black-12431851

https://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/fp/news/local/inquiry-hears-nun-told-boy-he-was-garbage/ 

APRIL 25th 2018

screenshot_20180425-113556323180826.jpg

https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/news/aberdeen/1461564/witnesses-tell-of-beatings-electric-shocks-and-force-feeding-at-aberdeen-home/

APRIL 24th 2018

A senior figure in the Catholic Church has been accused of orchestrating a “hostile rejection” of claims nuns were involved in the abuse of children.

The Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry is currently hearing evidence relating to alleged abuse at four former children’s homes run by the Sisters of Nazareth.

Yesterday a lawyer for the victims said Archbishop Emeritus Mario Conti had dismissed the allegations at Nazareth House in Aberdeen while bishop in the city, even allegedly referring to survivors as “the opposition”.

The inquiry also heard the congregation had previously denied there had been volunteers working in its establishments, despite the conviction earlier this year of a man who sexually abused three children at a home in Glasgow in the 1980s while working as a volunteer.

The Sisters of Nazareth ran children’s homes in Aberdeen, Cardonald in Glasgow, Lasswade near Edinburgh and Kilmarnock in Ayrshire until their closure in the 1980s.

The inquiry, led by Lady Smith, yesterday heard police have received 308 complaints about 194 people associated with the institutions over a 50-year period.

Two senior figures from the order, who are not the subject of abuse allegations, sat in the public gallery as former residents spoke of a catalogue of abuse, including beatings, force-feedings and humiliations administered for wetting the bed.

One former resident, known only as “Rose” and now in her 70s, described one of the nuns at Nazareth House in Aberdeen as a “witch” who would bang children’s heads together or off walls if she considered them to be misbehaving.

The woman, who lived at the home in the 1940s and 1950s, said the children were made to bath in Jeyes Fluid, a disinfectant.

Simon Collins, a solicitor representing In-Care Abuse Survivors (Incas), said there had been a refusal to believe survivors in the past which had led to “missed opportunities”.

He said: “The attitude of the Catholic Church will also feature (in the upcoming evidence), with some letters from the then Bishop Mario Conti of Aberdeen of particular interest.

“In one, while discussing arrangements for refreshments at some sort of demonstration in favour of the Sisters, he makes what appears to be a reference to survivors as ‘the opposition’.

“In another, he issues the challenge that ‘Those who call others to account for their actions must be prepared to defend their own when they make allegations.’ Such remarks were certainly felt by survivors as pressure and threats.”

He added: “It is hard to avoid the thought that the bishop’s apparent anger and energy might have been more productive at the time if it had been put into more serious investigation of allegations as opposed to hostile rejection. He would be an interesting witness in this chapter.”

David Anderson, representing the Bishops’ Conference, said it was clear that not taking matters seriously in the past had been the “wrong thing to do”.

Giving evidence on behalf of the Sisters of Nazareth last year, Sister Anna Maria Doolan admitted children had been abused and said the order was “very sorry”.  The inquiry continues. https://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/archbishop-conti-accused-of-calling-child-abuse-victims-the-opposition-1-4729804

YOUNG girl was told “the devil was inside” he as she was beaten by a nun at a Scots children’s home.

The Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry heard claims of beatings at the hands of nuns, force-feeding to the point of vomiting, being locked in a dark room and being made to bathe in disinfectant.

Children were also told that nobody wanted them, the inquiry heard, while one witness said she was told “the devil was inside me” as a nun hit her.

“The psychological damage I saw people suffering … it’s unbelievable,” another witness told the hearing in Edinburgh.

The inquiry heard that police in Scotland have received more than 300 complaints of alleged abuse over a 50 year period at children’s homes run by a Catholic congregation. Officers have received 308 complaints about 194 people associated with institutions run by the Sisters of Nazareth from the 1930s to 1980s. The figure emerged as witnesses recounted a number of incidents of abuse they said they suffered at the order’s home in Aberdeen around the 1940s and 1950s.

The inquiry has begun hearing evidence about homes run by the order in four locations including: Aberdeen, Cardonald in Glasgow, Lasswade near Edinburgh and Kilmarnock in Ayrshire.

In opening remarks, Laura-Anne van der Westhuizen, representing Police Scotland, told chair Lady Smith: “Since 1995, police investigations have been undertaken in relation to reported abuse dating back to the 1930s within the Sisters of Nazareth institutions. Police Scotland has recovered records of complaints received from 308 former residents against 194 persons associated with children’s residences within Nazareth House institutions between 1934 and 1984. To date, 58 files concerning Sister of Nazareth institutions have been provided to the inquiry.”

One witness said today: “We were never loved, ever, by any of them.”

The woman now in her 70s, who cannot be named, was at the Aberdeen home in the 1940s and 1950s. She said she rarely saw her siblings and did not know her surname until she was 12 years old.

The witness told how one nun would make misbehaving children get down on their knees in front of her and she would bang their heads together.

She also recounted having to dust coffins which she believed contained the bodies of nuns and smelt of “death”. “You can’t forget that smell,” she said.

Mark Lindsay, solicitor for the Sisters of Nazareth, earlier repeated an “unreserved” apology to anyone abused in the congregation’s care. The inquiry continues on Wednesday. https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/2551156/nuns-abuse-devil-sisters-of-nazareth-child-abuse-inquiry/

More MSM from April 24th

Smyllum Park Orphanage. The Scottish Abuse Inquiry.

20th Jan 2018  Paedophile ex-priest ‘sorry’ for abusing four boys  https://www.scotsman.com/news/paedophile-ex-priest-sorry-for-abusing-four-boys-1-4666758

19 Jan 2018 

screenshot_20180120-121702397478226.jpg

20180120_1220281262266506.jpgscreenshot_20180120-121812569795253.jpg20180120_1223181738927344.jpg20180120_122404197895397.jpgscreenshot_20180120-1217541025467902.jpg

16th Jan 2018   Elderly nun, 92, denies beating and force-feeding children

MORE FROM SMYLLUM

Child abuse inquiry to probe Lanarkshire childrens homes run by nuns

NT

THE second phase of the Scottish child abuse inquiry will further investigate controversial children’s homes run by a Catholic Order of nuns.
It is examining historical allegations of the abuse of children in care and has been taking statements from witnesses since last spring. 
Officials said the first part of the second phase starting in autumn will focus on homes run by the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul, such as Smyllum Park in Lanark and Bellevue House in Rutherglen.
The head of the religious order which ran the controversial children’s homes has already described allegations of abuse as a “mystery”.
Sister Ellen Flynn, leader of the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul in Great Britain, told the inquiry her congregation could find “no evidence” of abuse taking place at Smyllum Park.
The inquiry, led by Lady Smith, heard more than 4,000 children passed through the home between 1930 and its closure in 1981.
Former residents have alleged the sisters administered severe beatings at Smyllum, where the bodies of up to 100 orphans lie in an unmarked grave.
The inquiry earlier heard how neither the sisters nor lay staff at the school had qualifications for looking after children until they began to undertake childcare courses in the late 1960s.
As well as a small group of nuns, the school employed between 30 to 35 people as childcare workers, nurses, laundry workers and handymen, all of whom could access the children unaccompanied.
The inquiry also heard that in the early part of the century it had been “common practice” to separate siblings.
While the inquiry heard that “some very good archival evidence” exists in relation to Smyllum, it was told there are no records of punishments which were handed out.
Yesterday it was revealed that Phase 2 hearings will start on November 28 and applications are being sought to give evidence into the two Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul homes.
A spokesman for the inquiry said: “The deadline for leave to appear in relation to the first case study is September 4. Applicants must show that they have a direct or substantial interest in the scope and purpose of the hearings.  
“The evidence given at the hearings will supplement written statements taken from witnesses in advance and documents recovered by the inquiry team during investigations.”
Public hearings began in Edinburgh in May and a series of religious organisations has admitted children were abused in their care and issued apologies, including the Catholic Church in Scotland. The hearings have heard a catalogue of damning testimony about the loss or destruction of vital records kept by institutions accused of presiding over abusive regimes.
Legislation lifting the time-limit on damages for child abuse cases was passed by the Scottish parliament earlier this year.The Bill removes the current three-year limitation period for personal injury actions in cases of child abuse where the person was under 18 at the time.
It will apply to all cases of child abuse after September 1964 – but campaigners are still lobbying for justice for those who were abused before then.
Religious orders are also facing demands for redress for victims. During the inquiry, the Catholic Church said it was considering cash compensation for survivors. The cost may be at least £200million.
In early 2018, the inquiry will examine homes run by Sisters of Nazareth, investigating Nazareth House sites in Aberdeen, Cardonald, Kilmarnock and Lasswade. 

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/15463546.Child_abuse_inquiry_to_probe_Lanarkshire_childrens_homes_run_by_nuns/        https://archive.is/EpJVI